Tag Archives: Java

Localisation Verifier – A Custom Java Module for Script Developer

Introduction

When employing XLT Script Developer you usually resort to automated or manual scripting to drive your testing. Sometimes though you will face a very specific or complex task that can not be expressed that easy with the standard scripting capabilities of Script Developer. For these types of scenarios Script Developer provides the option to integrate a custom Java module. With custom modules you have the full power of your Java runtime and are able to achieve virtually any testing objective.

The following blog post will describe a small custom Java module we created and used recently. By this example we will explain when to choose this route and demonstrate the creation and execution of Java modules. Ultimately you will be able to add Script Developer’s custom module option to your testing arsenal.
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Simplify Your Life With a Little UI Automation

Are you familiar with someone asking you to do things such as putting all of your clients into the new CRM or inserting 80 new users in a software product x? If so and if your software has no import feature, you probably found yourself copying and pasting all day long. A simple way to save you from this torture is using a UI automation tool like Sikuli Script.

What is Sikuli?

Sikuli automates UI functionalities like mouse, keyboard, and clipboard actions. It works with UI recognition to identify UI components such as buttons, input fields, or menus. To use this kind of recognition, Sikuli compares the actual screen with screenshots from the user.
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Handle authentication during WebDriver testing

Sometimes authentication is necessary before a test case can be executed. While HtmlUnit based tests can easily enter and confirm authentication requests, most browser based tests, cannot workaround the dialog. This is a browser security measure to prevent automated data capture and/or data entering. WebDriver for Firefox delivers a solution for that problem, but IE and Chrome rely on a manual interaction with the browser before the test automation can run.

The following steps describe a solution for the authentication problem and how to run a script test case as WebDriver based test. The key to this solution is the usage of Sikuli, an image based testing tool that directly interacts with the screen to find the right elements by using the screen.
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Spurious wakeup – the rare event

After hunting for quite some time for a strange application behavior, I finally found the reason.

The Problem

The Java application was behaving strangely in 4 out of 10 runs. It did not process all data available and assumed that the data input already ended. The application features several producer-consumer patterns, where one thread offers preprocessed data to the next one, passing it into a buffer where the next thread reads it from.

The consumer or producer fall into a wait state in case no data is available or the buffer is full. In case of a state change, the active threads notifies all waiting threads about the new data or the fact that all data is consumed.

On 2-core and 8-core machines, the application was running fine but when we moved it to 24-cores, it suddenly started to act in an unpredictable manner.
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XLT – Garbage Collector details visualized

Today we want to give you a small preview of an upcoming XLT feature. Most of you probably know that XLT features agent statistics. These statistics help you to keep an eye on the health of the test execution engines (agents) to ensure that you do not influence the test results by providing insufficient hardware or by applying no or incorrect settings.

Most modern programming languages are virtual machine based and these machines have knobs you can turn to adjust their behavior according to your requirements. XLT runs on Java and so all the things you might have already learnt from tuning your Java-based servers apply to XLT as well. If you do not have experience in tuning your Java-based servers, you will learn a lot that can be applied to your servers and help you to increase performance.
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What is the state of the G1 Garbage Collector?

Because I do not know what is the current state of the Java G1 Garbage Collector, I decided to try G1 with JDK6u20. Somehow I was disappointed because after a short moment of predictable GC performance, the entire VM stopped and some major collection was running. You can easily see that in the charts of that run. Right around 20:09:45, the threads were stopped and the entire VM behaved ugly.

The G1 stop the world

So, the G1 is not yet ready for production, of course nobody stated that it is ready for production. If I read the release notes of JDK6u21 correctly, it delivers plenty of G1 changes, so I might try that soon.

Eclipse und Ubuntu 9.10

Wer seine eigene Eclipse-Installation unter Ubuntu 9.10 betreibt bzw. ältere Versionen von Eclipse im Einsatz hat, der kennt evenutell Probleme mit Buttons. Diese lassen sich oft mit der Maus nicht klicken oder anwählen. Nur mit Hife der Tastatur kann man noch etwas ausrichten.

Das Ganze ist ein bekanntes Problem seit Ubuntu 9.10 und sollte mit Eclipse 3.5.1 weg sein. Wenn das aber keine Lösung ist, dann muss man seine Umgebung mit diesem Parameter anpassen:

GDK_NATIVE_WINDOWS=true

Danach funktioniert es wieder. Die Lösung habe ich hier gefunden: Widdix – Eclipse unter Ubuntu 9.10 und hier gibt es mehr dazu in Englisch.

Java-GC unter die Haube schauen

Diese Optionen für das JDK6 sollte man kennen, wenn man dem Garbage Collector bei der Arbeit zusehen will. Speziell für das GC-Tuning sind diese Optionen unerlässlich:

Details zu den Optionen und zur Auswertung kann man unter GC Tuning oder in der Liste der JDK-Optionen finden.